History and Art to Interpret Forrest’s Poem

Here are some places to check out on the web followed by some commentary.  Placing the pictures in this blog is not allowed as the photos are copy written but just highlight and search and it will take you to some very photos.  I left the comments on the photos here for you to read.

1) Night falls around what was then Ranger Gary Brown’s home. Originally published in “Yellowstone Wildlife in Winter,” National Geographic magazine, November 1967
Today, this structure serves as the Lamar Ranger Station, which provides housing for the Lamar ranger and emergency visitor services. Built near the turn of the century, it is on the National Register of Historic Places.

2)1883 Arthur Brown “Yellowstone” Watercolor Painting   $75,000 – $125,000

Photograph by William Albert Allard

3)Yellowstone National Park
With famous rivers like the Firehole, Madison, Gibbon, Slough Creek, Lamar, Gardner, Pebble Creek, Cache Creek, Hellroaring, Soda Butte, and of course the headwaters of the Yellowstone, our first national park offers anglers endless angling opportunites throughout the summer and fall.  for big lake browns that are in the process of “running up” to spawn later in November…More Yellowstone National Park Info

4)Big Blaze looking back to Big Brother (Alpha)

Lamar Canyon Wolf Pack

The Yellowstone fires of 1988 were unprecedented in the history of the National Park Service

5)The photo below, taken in late September 1988 shows the fires smouldering in the Lamar. The valley shows no signs of the great fires today, but Specimen Ridge in the background will for a half century or more.
The fires of 1988 smouldering in the Lamar; The photo was taken at Rose Creek.

Copyright © Ralph Maughan.

The following have pictures and terms about cottonwoods as a blaze.  Very beautiful.

6)Kay Witherspoon 2007 “Autumn Embers ” 11″ x 14″ oil on Linen $2400Fall Foliage in British Columbia, Cariboo Region Fall Colour

7)The Cariboo Region in central British Columbia is ablaze with yellow cottonwoods in fall.

Chris Harris / Getty Images

Wish you could see pictures on this page.  It is worth seeing.

Top are three browns and the Rangers sometimes refer to the Valley as Brown Valley do to the large number of bears in the area. That makes four Browns.  But do any of these Browns lead us anywhere?

How about Brown trout? No. That would be any area from here to Alaska.  No help at all really.

How about a brown building?  Too many brown buildings in the mountains to be useful.

How about brown trout and brown buildings?  No help yet?

A clue to last over a hundred years something historical something that narrows down the search.

How about Ranger Gary A. Brown?  His home was in YNP that’s a good clue.

What else about Ranger Brown?  He was the assistant head director of the Yellowstone Nation Parks.  Oh, Fenn spent the best summers there in YNP.  Ranger Brown started a museum is Fenn into museums?  Yes, check out the Will Bill Cody Center in Cody just outside Yellowstone and not too far from Lamar Valley.

Any other Browns?   How about Arthur Brown he painted the watercolor of Mammoth Hot Springs.  It was appraised in Billings Montana not far from Yellowstone.  The painting itself has a very interesting history it may be fun to look it up if you’re a history buff.  The story even has some railroad history.

Years  writing,  a legacy at hand plus one maybe two million dollars in the mix would Fenn  just be writing junk?

How about the blaze is it the sun? No help.

Is it a sign on a tree?  This would be very helpful, but first where in the Rockys do we look.

Is it a wise person who finds the blaze or is it by study we find the blaze?  To keep from being left out of the chase I hope it is through study.

Any historical blaze around?  The 1988 Blaze in Yellowstone change the U.S. Forest Dept’s policies on Forest fires.  That’s historical.  It also came close to burning down Silver and Cooke City in the NE corner of YNP just missing the Roosevelt Hotel.  The fire started just north of Gary Brown’s home and it crossed the Lamar river  just down from Brown’s old home.

How about the wolf who lived there named Big Blaze oh and don’t forget Little Blaze.  The Lamar Valley wolf pack has lots of followers.  Check out Blaze the wolf in Yellowstone it is very cool.  He is no longer with us and that is sad.

Ok, you decide, have you heard of better clues?  Why not share them.  Is there anyone as redundant?  I keep finding clues that shout Yellowstone, Lamar Valley and Lamar Ranger Station.  If there were something that backs this up it is the lack of info about these clues.  No one is talking about these clues maybe because they are keeping the good ones to themselves.  I don’t blame them but I believe they are too late.

If you do find the treasure couldn’t you just take a picture on a dated news paper for the rest of us.  It would have saved me a lot of money on travel etc..  After all I love to chase things that I have some chance of catching.  Fenn knows but he ain’t talking.   Maybe my interpretation of his poem is much better than his.

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Forrest Fenn’s treasure chase Tag your it

Running around the web in my quest for info on the treasure’s location is fun and fascinating.  All the attributes and misgivings in human nature come out to play even my own.  I have come off to some as arrogant over confident and to others as conceded and self center.  Blinded by my own thoughts and the ever growing need to know I have allowed myself to become indulgent reading everything on the subject and rejecting all that doesn’t consider what I feel are the facts.  Coaching others to be their best has led me to believe the mind is the greatest place to start when we face challenges.  Modesty and sportsmanship, important characteristics in life’s journey are hard to find in the young hero. It is the hero’s down fall that causes the Phoenix to burn become pure and rise from the ashes.  Confidence in the leader has won many a lost battle.  It keeps us moving toward the goal no matter how hard. The top of the list of athletes I have had the honor to work with believed in themselves and in their coaches.  Get a vision see it clearly and stick to it.  Wisdom is different.  Wisdom lacks the ego.  Wisdom hears all sides and finds the value in them.  Fenn’s poem spoke to me I went with confidence saw what I saw  and now your it.  All those in the chase your it.  Let us find the Treasure or the end of the chase.  Let’s listen and reason together. This is my intent to hear others and to compare.  The Chase is a wonderful thing I have chased gold in Yankee, Achorage, Idaho city, San Pedros, Golden, Nevada, Utah, Dakota, Idaho and Oregon.   Comparing notes with old timers and newbies is the way I was taught to be apart of  the community.  Is the treasure still out there?  Is the poem a real map or is it just a poem with as many meanings as there are interpreters?  Tag your it.

Lastly those of you who visited this blog from other countries I am so interested in what you think.  I would love to hear from any of you.  There are visitors from Germany, England, Poland, Canada, and the Netherlands.  It is exciting to see so how about leaving a comment.  Also how about the new layout? Like or not?

Part 3 The blaze just down from the home of Brown

Stop at the first turn-out past Lamar Ranger Research Station.  The turn out  is on the left side of Highway 212 about a half mile west or down stream.  Remember only verses 2, 4 and 6 are leading the reader to the treasure.  Verses 1,3 and 5 are true but they are only meant to distract the reader.  Verse 2 tells where to start and where to put in.

The “wise” may find the blaze.  A little history, as before, leads to the three references to the treasure’s location.  The famous Blaze of 1988 started in Quartz Creek about a half mile north of Lamar Ranger Station and later the blaze that threatened Cooke City crossed the Lamar River just up from the Lamar River Canyon.  A picture of where it crossed can be found on the internet.  National Geographic refers to the 1988 fire as “The Blaze” in the headline. The matriarch wolf of the pack living in the Lamar Canyon has a name and her name is Blaze.  She was shot a few years ago and is no longer living.  Looking from the car into the valley from the turn out you can see the blaze especially in September when the treasure was hidden by lonesome Forrest Fenn.  It is then that the valley is ablaze with cottonwoods as they turn color.

Forrest is a active member of the Wild Bill Cody Museum in Cody, Wyoming  just outside the Northeast Gate of YNP.  This is the way he would come to spend his summers away from his dreaded school life in Lubbock, Texas.  The museum has a black bow tie  ball in September.  Oh, by the by, Gary Brown is the founder of the Forest Ranger’s Museum.  Lots of history for an antiques dealer’s poem.

Find the blaze and “quickly look down.”  There are three groups of cottonwoods one south of Lamar Station and two more as you look down from there.  After that “just heavy loads and water high.”  Boulders the size of cars says a brochure on places to stop and look in the YNP but that is in verse 5  to mislead the reader.  A blaze or mark on a tree won’t last long because the bears claw the trees until the bark is almost completely torn away.  Thus “no place for the meek.”

The next part  will divulge the last verse’s clue “in the wood.”